40 : Munch’s Hus (Norwegian)

Munch’s Hus fitted the bill in a week that I had been craving some seafood. It is a traditional Norwegian restaurant on the border of Kreuzberg and Schoenberg with a lot of fish on the menu in a bit of strange nowhere location. On a balmy Saturday the inside, which is decorated with Munch paintings, was empty but the terrace was full enough for us not to worry.

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Soused herring

We tried some overpriced Norwegian Arctic beer while we decided what to order. I chose the daily menu which for 25 euros consisted of a soused herring and cranberry starter and mixed fish skewers with a saffron sauce. Richard went for a fish platter starter and roasted Elk for a main (18 euros). The prices were quite dear for Berlin but we had been saving money this weekend as we knew it wasn’t cheap. We chose a decent bottle of spanish Ribera del Duero from the fairly reasonable wine list.

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The food was pretty good but nothing that special for me to make the journey back. The herring was strange at first but tasted better when you combined it with the sharp cranberry and soft quails egg. The fish platter starter was pretty tasty featuring salmon, mackerel, herring and prawns with various Nordic style dressings. The fish in my skewers was a mixed bag with a perfectly cooked butterfly prawn but an overcooked piece of salmon and under seasoned monkfish surrounded by a tasty sauce. Richard’s elk was deep and gamey but perhaps a little dry and the ratio of mashed potato was ridiculous for the size of the meat. I liked the freshness of flavour and lightness of touch that you find in Scandinavian food but like the countries themselves, the food was too expensive for me.

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As for authenticity I am now not so sure as when I told my Norwegian friend Ida that we were eating there she asked if they had lutefisk (a gelatinous concoction made of dried white fisk and lye) because it is apparently a Norwegian favourite. I asked the waitress about it an she didn’t have a clue what is was.